Advertisement

Characterization of patients exposed to multiple devices but free of hospital-acquired infection at intensive care unit discharge

Published:December 13, 2014DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2014.10.022

      Highlights

      • Exposure to invasive devices is a major risk factor for hospital-acquired infection.
      • Intensive care unit patients free of hospital-acquired infection who were exposed to multiple devices were identified.
      • 5.0% of patients were multiexposed; 15.7% of patients remained uninfected.
      • Multiexposed infected patients differed from noninfected patients regarding mortality.
      • Patients did not differ regarding main risk factors for hospital-acquired infection.
      Intensive care unit patients exposed to multiple devices but free of hospital-acquired infection (HAI) until discharge were identified through a surveillance network of HAIs in Lyon, France, between 2003 and 2011. Multiexposed patients were defined according to the tenth deciles of length of stay and exposures to invasive devices. Overall, 982 (5.0%) multiexposed patients were identified; 154 (15.7%) remained uninfected. Multiexposed infected patients differed from noninfected patients regarding length of exposures and mortality.

      Key Words

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to American Journal of Infection Control
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Zarb P.
        • Coignard B.
        • Griskeviciene J.
        • Muller A.
        • Vankerckhoven V.
        • Weist K.
        • et al.
        The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) pilot point prevalence survey of healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial use.
        Euro Surveill. 2012; 17 (pii: 20316)
        • Richards M.J.
        • Edwards J.R.
        • Culver D.H.
        • Gaynes R.P.
        Nosocomial infections in medical intensive care units in the United States. National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System.
        Crit Care Med. 1999; 27: 887-892
        • Eggimann P.
        • Sax H.
        • Pittet D.
        Catheter-related infections.
        Microbes Infect. 2004; 6: 1033-1042
        • Vincent J.L.
        Nosocomial infections in adult intensive-care units.
        Lancet. 2003; 361: 2068-2077
        • Vanhems P.
        • Lepape A.
        • Savey A.
        • Jambou P.
        • Fabry J.
        Nosocomial pulmonary infection by antimicrobial-resistant bacteria of patients hospitalized in intensive care units: risk factors and survival.
        J Hosp Infect. 2000; 45: 98-106
        • Bénet T.
        • Allaouchiche B.
        • Argaud L.
        • Vanhems P.
        Impact of surveillance of hospital-acquired infections on the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia in intensive care units: a quasi-experimental study.
        Crit Care. 2012; 16: R161
        • Bochud P.Y.
        • Bochud M.
        • Telenti A.
        • Calandra T.
        Innate immunogenetics: a tool for exploring new frontiers of host defence.
        Lancet Infect Dis. 2007; 7: 531-542
        • Picard C.
        • Casanova J.L.
        • Abel L.
        Mendelian traits that confer predisposition or resistance to specific infections in humans.
        Curr Opin Immunol. 2006; 18: 383-390
        • Scrimshaw N.S.
        • SanGiovanni J.P.
        Synergism of nutrition, infection, and immunity: an overview.
        Am J Clin Nutr. 1997; 66: S464-S477