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Infection prevention strategies for procedures performed outside operating rooms: A conceptual integrated model

  • Vincent Masse
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Vincent Masse, MD, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, 200 Hawkins Dr, #C512-GH, Iowa City, IA 52242. (V. Masse).
    Affiliations
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA

    Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada
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  • Michael B. Edmond
    Affiliations
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA

    Office of Clinical Quality Safety and Quality Improvement, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA
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  • Daniel J. Diekema
    Affiliations
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA

    Department of Pathology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA
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Published:September 20, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2017.07.030

      Highlights

      • No consensus exists regarding infection prevention for most procedures.
      • We developed a classification of infection prevention strategies for procedures.
      • This model is intended as a starting point for further efforts on the topic.
      No comprehensive guidelines or classification exist for infection prevention strategies for medical procedures performed outside operating rooms. We reviewed the available literature and used our clinical experience to develop a progressive, 5-tiered classification of procedures, encompassing clean, aseptic, sterile-superficial, sterile-invasive, and surgical-like procedures to address this need. We provide a description of these categories, along with relevant examples. We fully acknowledge the limitations of our work, which is intended as a starting point for future efforts and not to be definitive.

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