Advertisement

Comparison of keyboard colonization before and after use in an inpatient setting and the effect of keyboard covers

  • Anirudha Das
    Affiliations
    Department of Neonatology, Cleveland Clinic Children's Hospital, Cleveland, OH

    Center for Clinical Informatics Research and Education, The MetroHealth System, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
    Search for articles by this author
  • Jennifer Conti
    Affiliations
    The Center for Quality, The MetroHealth System, Cleveland, OH
    Search for articles by this author
  • Jennifer Hanrahan
    Affiliations
    The Center for Quality, The MetroHealth System, Cleveland, OH

    Department of Internal Medicine, The MetroHealth System, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
    Search for articles by this author
  • David C. Kaelber
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to David C. Kaelber, MD, PhD, MPH, The MetroHealth System, Case Western Reserve University, 2500 MetroHealth Dr, Cleveland, OH 44109. (D.C. Kaelber).
    Affiliations
    Center for Clinical Informatics Research and Education, The MetroHealth System, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

    Department of Internal Medicine, The MetroHealth System, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

    Department of Pediatrics, The MetroHealth System, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

    Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, The MetroHealth System, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
    Search for articles by this author
Published:November 09, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2017.09.012
      Computer keyboards may contribute to patient infections. We cultured new keyboards, with/without keyboard covers, before placing them in adult inpatient rooms and recultured after 6 months. Nonpathogenic bacteria were present initially but potentially pathogenic bacteria were cultured only after use. Coagulase negative Staphylococcus colonization increased after use (P < .001). Keyboards with a cover had more potentially pathogenic bacteria (22% vs 16%), which although not significant statistically (P = .72), likely due to sample size, trended against covers offering protection.

      Key Words

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to American Journal of Infection Control
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Collen M.F.
        General requirements for a Medical Information System (MIS).
        Comput Biomed Res. 1970; 3: 393-406
        • Dick R.S.
        • Steen E.D.
        The computer-based patient record: an essential technology for health care.
        (and the; Committee on Improving the Patient Record, Institute of Medicine) National Academy Press, Washington, DC1991
        • Hartmann B.
        • Benson M.
        • Junger A.
        • Quinzio L.
        • Röhrig R.
        • Fengler B.
        • et al.
        Computer keyboard and mouse as a reservoir of pathogens in an intensive care unit.
        J Clin Monit Comput. 2004; 18: 7-12
        • Neely A.N.
        • Maley M.P.
        • Warden G.D.
        Computer keyboards as reservoirs for Acinetobacter baumannii in a burn hospital.
        Clin Infect Dis. 1999; 29: 1358-1360
        • Schultz M.
        • Gill J.
        • Zubairi S.
        • Huber R.
        • Gordin F.
        Bacterial contamination of computer keyboards in a teaching hospital.
        Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2003; 24: 302-303
        • Bures S.
        • Fishbain J.T.
        • Uyehara C.F.
        • Parker J.M.
        • Berg B.W.
        Computer keyboards and faucet handles as reservoirs of nosocomial pathogens in the intensive care unit.
        Am J Infect Control. 2000; 28: 465-471
        • Devine J.
        • Cooke R.P.D.
        • Wright E.P.
        Is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination of ward-based computer terminals a surrogate marker for nosocomial MRSA transmission and handwashing compliance?.
        J Hosp Infect. 2001; 48: 72-75
      1. Hospital computer keyboards and keyboard covers harbor potentially harmful bacteria.
        Hosp Health Netw. 2005; 79: 81-82
        • Neely A.N.
        • Sittig D.F.
        Basic microbiologic and infection control information to reduce the potential transmission of pathogens to patients via computer hardware.
        J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2002; 9 (Review): 500-508