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Detection of carbapenem resistant enterobacteriace from fomite surfaces

  • Evelyn A. Flores
    Affiliations
    Infectious Disease Clinical Outcomes Research Unit, Division of Infectious Diseases, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-University of California Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance, CA
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  • Bryn Launer
    Affiliations
    Infectious Disease Clinical Outcomes Research Unit, Division of Infectious Diseases, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-University of California Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance, CA

    University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO
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  • Loren G. Miller
    Affiliations
    Infectious Disease Clinical Outcomes Research Unit, Division of Infectious Diseases, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-University of California Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance, CA

    Division of Adult Infectious Diseases, Department of Adult Infectious Diseases, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA
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  • Kaye Evans
    Affiliations
    Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine CA
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  • Dennys Estevez
    Affiliations
    Infectious Disease Clinical Outcomes Research Unit, Division of Infectious Diseases, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-University of California Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance, CA

    Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA
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  • Susan S. Huang
    Affiliations
    Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine CA
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  • James A. McKinnell
    Affiliations
    Infectious Disease Clinical Outcomes Research Unit, Division of Infectious Diseases, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-University of California Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance, CA
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  • Michael A. Bolaris
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Michael A. Bolaris, MD, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, 1000 W. Carson St., Building RB3, Box 467, Torrance, CA 90502.
    Affiliations
    Infectious Disease Clinical Outcomes Research Unit, Division of Infectious Diseases, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-University of California Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance, CA

    Division of Adult Infectious Diseases, Department of Adult Infectious Diseases, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA

    Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA
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      Highlights

      • There are significant challenges in selective media to identify carbapenem resistant enterobacteriace (CRE) from fomites.
      • We share our experience with HardyCHROM CRE plates and modified MacConkey agar.
      • Modified MacConkey may be more beneficial for detection of CRE from environment.
      Accurately identifying carbapenem resistant enterobacteriace (CRE) from fomites is critical for infection control practices, research, and assessing patient risk. We compared a commercial CRE agar intended for patient use with a modified MacConkey agar. We found that our modified MacConkey agar was more selective at identifying CRE from environmental sources

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      References

      1. Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Healthcare Settings | HAI | CDC. 2018. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/hai/organisms/cre/index.html. Accessed August 9, 2018

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