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Trends in place of early-season influenza vaccination among adults, 2014-15 through 2018-19 influenza seasons—The importance of medical and nonmedical settings for vaccination

Published:October 07, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2020.09.016

      Highlights

      • Place of influenza vaccination was stable over the 5 influenza seasons assessed.
      • Proportion vaccinated in medical setting ranged 49%-53% in 2014-15 to 2018-19 seasons.
      • Proportion vaccinated in nonmedical setting ranged 47%-51% in 2014-15 to 2018-19 seasons.
      • Doctor's office was the most common place receiving vaccine in 2018-19 season (34.4%).
      • In 2018-19 season, 32.2% vaccinated in pharmacies/stores and 15.0% in workplaces.

      Background

      Annual vaccination is the most effective strategy for preventing influenza. We assessed trends and demographic and access-to-care characteristics associated with place of vaccination in recent years.

      Methods

      Data from the 2014-2018 National Internet Flu Survey were analyzed to assess trends in place of early-season influenza vaccination during the 2014-15 through 2018-19 seasons. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to identify factors independently associated with vaccination settings in the 2018-19 season.

      Results

      Among vaccinated adults, the proportion vaccinated in medical (range: 49%-53%) versus nonmedical settings (range: 47%-51%) during the 2014-15 through 2018-19 seasons were similar. Among adults aged ≥18 years vaccinated early in the 2018-19 influenza season, a doctor's office was the most common place (34.4%), followed by pharmacies or stores (32.3%), and workplaces (15.0%). Characteristics significantly associated with an increased likelihood of receipt of vaccination in nonmedical settings among adults included household income ≥$50,000, having no doctor visits since July 1, 2018, or having a doctor visit but not receiving an influenza vaccination recommendation from the medical professional.

      Conclusions

      Place of early-season influenza vaccination among adults who reported receiving influenza vaccination was stable over 5 recent seasons. Both medical and nonmedical settings were important places for influenza vaccination. Increasing access to vaccination services in medical and nonmedical settings should be considered as an important strategy for improving vaccination coverage.

      Key Words

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