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Methodology minute: Utilizing the RAND/UCLA appropriateness method to develop guidelines for infection prevention

  • Karina R. Charles
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Karina Charles, MNurs (PICU), Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Queensland Children's Hospital, 501 Stanley St, South Brisbane, QLD, 4101, Australia.
    Affiliations
    Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Queensland Children's Hospital, South Brisbane Queensland, Australia

    School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia

    Menzies Health Institute Queensland, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia
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  • Lisa Hall
    Affiliations
    School of Public Health, University of Queensland, Herston, Queensland, Australia
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  • Amanda J Ullman
    Affiliations
    School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia

    Menzies Health Institute Queensland, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia

    Children's Health Queensland Hospital and Health Service, South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
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  • Jessica A. Schults
    Affiliations
    Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Queensland Children's Hospital, South Brisbane Queensland, Australia

    School of Public Health, University of Queensland, Herston, Queensland, Australia

    School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia

    Children's Health Queensland Hospital and Health Service, South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

    Metro North Hospital and Health Service, Queensland, Australia
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Published:December 28, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2021.12.012

      Highlights

      • The RAND/ULCA Appropriateness Method can inform guideline creation for IP practice
      • In-line suction for patients with highly infectious respiratory disease is advised
      • In the absence of clinical trial data, the RAND/ULCA Method can be utilized

      Abstract

      The use of the RAND/UCLA appropriateness method is an innovative way to provide practical, evidence based clinical guidance to infection preventionist (IP) in the absence of clinical trial data. This brief primer aims to introduce the IP to the methodology, including a short case study demonstrating the utilization of the method in the arena of infection prevention and management.

      Key Words

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