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Concerns and frustrations about the public reporting of device-related healthcare-associated infections: Perspectives of hospital leaders and staff

  • Sarah R. MacEwan
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Sarah R. MacEwan, PhD, Division of General Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, 700 Ackerman Rd, Suite 4000, Columbus, OH 43202.
    Affiliations
    Division of General Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

    The Center for the Advancement of Team Science, Analytics, and Systems Thinking (CATALYST), College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
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  • Alice A. Gaughan
    Affiliations
    The Center for the Advancement of Team Science, Analytics, and Systems Thinking (CATALYST), College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
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  • Eliza W. Beal
    Affiliations
    The Center for the Advancement of Team Science, Analytics, and Systems Thinking (CATALYST), College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

    Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
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  • Courtney Hebert
    Affiliations
    The Center for the Advancement of Team Science, Analytics, and Systems Thinking (CATALYST), College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

    Department of Biomedical Informatics, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

    Division of Infectious Diseases, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
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  • John Oliver DeLancey
    Affiliations
    The Center for the Advancement of Team Science, Analytics, and Systems Thinking (CATALYST), College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

    Department of Urology, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
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  • Ann Scheck McAlearney
    Affiliations
    The Center for the Advancement of Team Science, Analytics, and Systems Thinking (CATALYST), College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

    Department of Biomedical Informatics, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

    Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
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Published:August 07, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2022.08.003

      Highlights

      • Concerns exist around the public reporting of healthcare-associated infections.
      • Hospital leaders and staff have important perspectives about these concerns.
      • Qualitative research methods provide insight into concerns about public reporting.
      • Leaders and staff voice frustration in how infections are identified and attributed.

      Abstract

      Background

      Public reporting of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) aims to incentivize improvement in infection prevention. The motivation and mechanisms of public reporting have raised concerns about the reliability of this data, but little is known about the specific concerns of hospital leaders and staff. This study sought to better understand perspectives of individuals in these roles regarding the identification and public reporting of HAIs.

      Methods

      We conducted interviews with 471 participants including hospitals leaders (eg, administrative and clinical leaders) and hospital staff (eg, physicians and nurses) between 2017 and 2019 across 18 US hospitals. A semistructured interview guide was used to explore perspectives about the use of HAI data within the context of management strategies used to support infection prevention.

      Results

      Interviewees described concerns about public reporting of HAI data, including a lack of trust in the data and inadvertent consequences of its public reporting, as well as specific frustrations related to the identification and accountability for publicly-reported HAIs.

      Conclusion

      Concerns and frustrations related to public reporting of HAI data highlight the need for improved guidelines, transparency, and incentives. Efforts to build trust in publicly-reported HAI data can help ensure this information is used effectively to improve infection prevention practices.

      Key Words

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